lovesick

Infect me. Really. Four years after my divorce, I am ready. Or am I? And why did I choose the word lovesick? Why not simply love? I’m not sure, I’m only certain I want the heart-pounding, stomach-swooping sickness that falling in love brings. I’m ignoring the other side of lovesick. The anxiety and uncertainty, the delirium and yes, obsession it brings.

Some days I’m not sure I want to handle more stress, good or bad. Other days the urge to be swept away, overwhelmed by something outside of myself is intense. Several things vex me about this burgeoning desire to be lovesick. What if I think I’m open to love but I’m not—I’m sending out stay away vibes without being aware of it? This is a distinct possibility. My capacity for deluding myself is infinitely reliable. My intuition is of no help here, it is blind to my own faults. Hopefully I’m sending those vibes to the men who would be wrong for me. Then again, I had a talent for choosing the wrong guy when I was younger. Maybe I haven’t lost that talent yet. I also tend to protect my heart. I know, don’t we all? I have raised this to a fine art, probably from the moment my birth mother gave me away. Sometimes I wonder if I’ve ever been completely open to intimacy. I’d like to think I have and am, but I wouldn’t swear on a Bible or anything (not that swearing on a Bible is reliable with an atheist, anyway).

What if the object of my desire is already in my life, and I am too blind to see it? See above. My talents are freakish and specific. I can tie cherry stems in my mouth. I can identify obscure pop songs. I know how to fold fitted sheets. My past history tells me I have had fabulous men in my life who I’ve pushed away, because they were way too together for me. I have changed, but who knows? Self-sabotage is also another of my talents. The corollary to this is what if the sickness isn’t reciprocated? That’s thinking awfully far ahead, but still…Strangely, this doesn’t freak me out as much as it would have in the past. I don’t have to have love. I want love. The difference is immense.

The last concerns all have to do with Lyme. What if I can’t handle love? This sounds ridiculous to the healthy, but to us chronically ill people, this is a real issue. Stress, good and bad, can trigger a shift. Being lovesick could translate into simply being sick. On the other hand, perhaps love helps the body and mind heal. Wouldn’t that be great? My yearning to be lovesick might be an intuitive quest for health. Kinda takes the romantic part out of it. Which brings up another issue: am I chasing after a high that is unrealistic? After all, that’s what I daydream about, walks in the park (preferably on a sunny, mild day), romantic dinners, slow dancing in the kitchen. not the reality of dirty socks and clashing needs. Sometimes I worry that this makes me more than a little silly, like I haven’t evolved much beyond seventh grade crushing. If only it were that easy. I’d get my friend to go to his friend with a note that has two checkboxes: do you a) like or b) don’t like Melissa? Fill out and give back to <fill in friend’s name here>.

Lyme also has given me a checkered resume. Who wants to take on someone who has health problems? In fact, on paper, I pretty much suck. I want someone to give me a chance, but would I give them a chance? I guess that depends on how lovesick I am. Also, (and for me this is gigantic), how judgmental is this person? It is surprising how many people I have met who do not understand what it means to be chronically ill. Those of us who have been lucky enough to experience the special gift of serious illness have usually learned far more than they wanted about themselves. We don’t judge. You never know what someone else is going through. I’m not sure I can be with someone who helpfully suggests that maybe I need to suck it up and then I’ll magically feel better. That man is not going to be too understanding the fourth of fifth time I need to go to bed for a few days.

Jeez, I might have talked myself out of wanting to be lovesick. It all seems like a lot of work, finding someone, getting to know them, falling in love with them, coexisting with them, being open to being hurt…nah…this is one bug I think I could happily live with.

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symptoms

I don’t write much about the symptoms of Lyme. For one, it’s a rather long list. For another, who really cares, except for me, who experiences them? But I’ve been thinking about symptoms lately, because now that I’m getting out more, people ask me what my symptoms were. I kind of hem and haw and tell a light anecdote to give them the picture. Here’s the big problem: there are over one hundred symptoms for Lyme (http://www.anapsid.org/lyme/symptoms/ , http://www.lymenet.org/BurrGuide200810.pdf). Lyme mimics fibromyalgia, MS, ALS, Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and up to 350 more diseases. To try and standardize the list for all patients is impossible. I never had much problem with arthritis-like swelling and pain, where others are wheelchair bound. Every Lyme patient has their own peculiar set of symptoms.

Taken one by one, most of the symptoms aren’t that bad. Combined, though, and suffered day after day after day, they wear on you. The final insult comes when you start treatment. You get sicker! Woo-hoo! Nothing like endotoxins and side effects to ice the cake on sickness. I’m not sharing this for pity. I don’t want to hear “I’m so sorry you’ve been so sick”. Well, maybe I do, sometimes. What I want is to help anyone avoid Lyme in the first place. I want people to understand what Lyme disease can become if not caught early. The physical, emotional and financial toll is too high stand by idly.

I keep journals. I have kept them off and on for the past twenty years, but I’ve been fairly consistent post-divorce. There is a row of notebooks in my office, each one filled out from the top of the first page to the bottom of the last page, front and back, no paragraphs or indents. Just words. The ones from living with Lyme this past fifteen months give me a glimpse into my sickness, in case I want to forget.

Okay, here is one from  December 8. It was crisp outside and my one goal for the day was to walk the dogs. I had returned from New York where I was diagnosed with mid-stage Lyme disease: borrelia burgdorferi, babesia , and bartonella. I had fifty-six symptoms checked off. One of the worst was an abnormally slow heart rate. That morning I shuffled one quarter-mile. I have a pulse rate app. I did it three times during the walk. 42. 88. 44. I talked to myself, told myself I could do this. Every bone and muscle in my body ached, I had foggy spots in the middle of each eye. My teeth hurt, as did my head. I had to stop twice because of dizziness. I made that damn walk. I went to bed and slept. I woke up and took my meds (I’ll write a blog about that soon…it’ll blow your mind). I watched the Hallmark Channel (still trying to figure that one out!). Cried. Ate. Went back to bed. And that was all the entry said for that day. I’ve paraphrased here, because much of my journal writing is a stream-of-consciousness blast of cheerleading and venting.

You get the picture. Telling this out loud, in public, is almost as terrifying as taking off all my clothes in public. Why do I balk at talking about this? Was it my parents’ no nonsense midwestern sensibility? My own bias towards sickness and sick people? What? I can’t figure this one out. Maybe it has to do with whining? I am NOT a whiner (I’m a bitcher, but that is a whole different skill set). Or the ‘poor me’ syndrome. Awful. This brings me to play time. Now that I’m getting better, I am eager to date, to play pickleball, see friends, get out and do something. Well, what should happen but guilt. Big chunks of shoulds and have tos weighed me down. I should be working if I feel better. I have to get this yard in shape and take care of business. I bitched about this problem (curse words were involved…see the difference from whining?)  to my therapist. I’m pretty sure he answered with a question. “Why should you feel bad? Don’t you deserve to have some fun?” W.T.F. Have fun? Was he mad?

I felt a tremendous sense of guilt about being sick for so long. After all, if you are sick, you are not being productive. And not being productive is a sin. A mother’s definition, America’s definition, and mine, apparently. So. I am working on this notion that it is okay to have happiness after a long illness. I don’t have to plunge into everything, all at once. I played pickleball this morning. It made me happy. I saw old friends and felt the heady rush of playing a game. The rest of the day has been better. I’m actually working harder in between bouts of playing. It could be that play is vitally important to recovering health. Play gives me a truer taste of life as it was. Life has been lots and lots of watery gruel the past sixteen months. I’m ready for spice and comfort food.

 

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