moving

I can always tell when I’m fighting an infection now. Babesia, a malaria-like protozoan parasite co-infection that hasn’t been in the picture for over two years (maybe more, I can’t keep all this shit straight) has returned. It’s probably due to an overload of stress and activity. I’m selling my house and down-sizing. I made the decision, traveled to Denver, prepared the house, and sold it all in three weeks. Fortunately, I have plenty of experience in this area. I’ve moved 39 times (give or take a few hasty moves in my college years) both as a child and as an adult. When I was married, I was the one who did all the legwork to prepare the house for selling and moving. As a child, I watched my mom do the same thing. She was highly organized and I don’t recall any trauma from a poorly thought out move. So I scrubbed, cleaned, packed some things up, and made the house look like someone would like to live there.

Houses are selling in less than a weekend in Denver at considerably more than the asking price. I don’t know when I’ll ever see a stronger seller’s market for houses in my price category again. It was no surprise when we had an offer Monday morning after the first weekend.

All that activity wore me down and that’s what babesia was waiting for.  This is part of the reason I’m downsizing in the first place. The more stress I can eliminate from my life the more I can control relapses (I hope!). There was no sneaking up with this infection. It barreled in back in early June and it is raging right now, in spite of being on medication. And babesia has a unique set of symptoms: my eyes ache, itch, water, and blur, my teeth hurt deep in my jaws, I have a sharp headache constantly, I break out in sweats, my muscles ache, and my brain gets anxious and angry. I know, you’re thinking it sounds a lot like my other co-infection symptoms, and you’d be right. It’s the nature of the symptoms that is different. I could write pages on the differences, but I’d bore both myself and you. Let’s just say you know it when you feel it.

At any rate, the end result is a body in combat. I sleep a LOT, like ten or more hours a day. This Sunday I couldn’t stay up for the entire Wimbledon Men’s Championship match. Bear in mind, this was 10:30 am. I’d been up for four hours. In my defense, I detest Novak Djokovic, so not seeing him play isn’t exactly a hardship. It’s just frustrating to bow down to my body’s needs instead of doing what I want. I slept until a little after twelve and when I woke up, Djokovic had won. Yuck. I don’t like him. I find his whiny arrogance combined with his neediness that tennis fans adore him off-putting. I didn’t had the energy to do much else. It is one of the truths of chronic Lyme that it takes a tremendous amount of energy to fight off active infections, especially a parasitic one that feasts on red blood cells, like babesia. 

The other sign my body is working overtime is my appetite. I am constantly hungry. Not junk food kind of hunger, but a deep urge to eat nourishing foods. I crave fruit, protein, vegetables, and fats. I give in to the cravings because I think my body knows what it needs when it’s laboring like this. Today it was leftover grits and fried catfish with some eggs on top for breakfast. Lunch was a big salad and sardines (go ahead haters, sardines are delish). I had popcorn for a snack and dinner was a baked sweet potato and steak. I’m still hungry. But I’m full. It’s annoying. What isn’t annoying is that I don’t gain a pound while this is happening.

So, I’m sleeping and eating or thinking about both most of the time right now. It’s a strange activity, fighting infections. I don’t necessarily feel ‘sick’. I feel like a bear must feel at the onset of hibernation. Grumpy and eating and eating for the long winter and becoming increasingly sleepy. If I don’t have anything else to do it’s not bad. I basically plan meals, cook, and lounge around waiting for sleep to overtake me. But I don’t get too much else done. I can only hope that allowing my body the rest and nourishment that it needs will get me back on track soon, because I have a lot to do in the next few month. I have to find another place to live, pack, and get rid of a bunch of stuff. I have to line up movers and a service to sell all the things we don’t want. I’ll have to sign a bazillion pieces of paper in order to sell and buy a place. I can’t say the process will be enjoyable. I can say moving is one of my life skills that has proven to be incredibly handy. I’ll do what I always do: forge ahead and remind myself daily that when it is over, I’ll be in a better place, physically, mentally, and financially.

Share

denial

I’ve never particularly been one for self-denial. Not that kind! Jeez, people. The kind where I don’t ‘allow’ myself to do things I might enjoy because I’m chronically ill. There are several reasons for this, but the main one is that over time, I have come to feel guilty for still being sick and have twisted this into a toxic “I’ll do it when I’m better” mantra. This was extremely easy to stick to during COVID, but now that the world is coming to life, I’m starting to wonder why I’ve been doing this.

As I expected, there are tons of articles about this. There is guilt, embarrassment, shame, and disappointing others, and whoa! back up…grief. I think I’ve discussed this one with my therapist, but I shrugged it off as something I’ve already been through. What if I haven’t, though, and this stupid mantra is one of the ways I’m dealing with mourning my old life. I didn’t know this, but ‘serious illness’ is #6 on the life-stress scale, after Death of a Spouse, Divorce, Marital Separation from a mate, Detention in Jail or Other Institution, and Death of a Close Family Member. I suppose I have ceased to think of Lyme as a serious illness anymore. It’s been with me for over six years now, but it’s nowhere near as debilitating as it was for the second, third, and fourth years.

Wow. Maybe I am grieving, because sometimes I forget that there were THREE WHOLE YEARS of being sick over 80% of the time. That’s crazy. I could be either beginning to grieve again, or emerging from a long period of grief. Ugh. I’m going to have to think about this.

Fortunately, I’m not alone in my journey. So many people are having trouble emerging after a year of lockdowns that there are columns offering advice on how to rejoin the world. The decisions can be overwhelming, especially if you have worries about catching anything. Can I fly? Is it better to drive? Where can I go, and once I get there, what can I do? When do I where a mask? What if someone confronts me about wearing/not wearing a mask?

Overall, I’m not particularly worried about any of these things. My fears are more existential, it seems. Do I deserve to be out here? Should I allow myself to be frivolous, to have fun? If I do, will it be my fault if I have a relapse?

I just noticed the language I used above, the words ‘deserve’, ‘allow’, ‘frivolous’, and ‘fault’: I am limiting myself, I’m not sure it matters if it’s because I feel guilty, or I’m embarrassed, or grieving. Now that COVID restrictions are lifting, there is no excuse for self-denial. I have to re-learn how to let go and do more things that I enjoy. This is different than relaxing. I have to relax and take it easy to stay healthy. But what good is a life that isn’t lived?

I came back to Denver this week for a lot of reasons, but one of the main ones was to see my Lyme doctor. I knew something was off kilter, but didn’t know what. I’ve had a return of babesia and bartonella. I asked him if it could have been something I’d done. He said maybe, or maybe they made a return for reasons unknown. I hate the feeling of bacteria, parasites, and spirochetes hiding in my body, little bombs just waiting for an opportune time to reemerge and proliferate and not having much control over it.

Babesia is a real fucker, and I’d forgotten the crippling symptoms. The main ones are burning, blurry, itchy eyes, neck pain (like whiplash bad), headaches, body aches, a wicked intermittent sore throat, drenching sweats, and constant fatigue. This one, though, is the one that gets me: migrating, unrelenting, throbbing pain in my teeth and jaws. It gets so bad that I can’t chew. I spend quite a bit of time thinking that it’s not babesia, that one or more of my teeth are truly rotting or cracked or something. That’s the babesia speaking, as there is also a mental fog/rage/OCD component to deal with. And then the pains move somewhere else, and my teeth are just fine.  All in all a miserable experience, one I was glad to put behind me several years ago. Seems that babesia has other plans for me, forming cysts in my body until the time is right.

When I’m relapsing and herxing, self-denial is the last thing on my mind, the thought of ‘getting out there’ momentarily shoved aside. On a day like today, I feel thankful to walk the dog, get through some Spanish, and take care of myself.

But like everything Lyme, I’ll take the herbs and medicines, and the flare-up will subside in a while. I will play catch up, and then I will start wondering if I should get myself out there into life. Logically speaking, if there is no predicting when I will relapse, wouldn’t the strategy be to ‘plan’ for a relapse after I’ve had a trip, or a conference, or whatever I choose to do? That’s kind of what I’m thinking about now. I’m not ashamed to admit that I’m scared. Scared of making plans and scared of NOT making plans. Both choices carry risks and neither is a guarantee that I won’t relapse and feel as awful and numb as I do right now.

I can’t live like that though, and I’m going to have to figure out a way to spin this to myself in order to move forward and live. I want to stop denying myself the pleasure of playing pickle ball, or taking a trip to see friends once in a while, or going to the movies, or even relaxing one afternoon to binge-watch tennis.I think I’ll give myself credit for recognizing my dilemma and work on stopping this self-denial and start planning for the future. When I feel better.

 

 

Share

vacation

I like vacations. I especially like unexpected vacations, like the one I was just on. I say “unexpected”, but I mean “forgot about”. This happens to me more than you’d think. To many people, being sick IS vacation. There is the luxury of staying home and taking care of yourself. I don’t know what this says about our society, that a “staycation” can be as desirable as a vacation, but I do know that being housebound because of illness is no vacation.

I don’t quite remember how this vacation came together, yet here I was, two days before departure, bitching to Katie about leaving. I am one of those people who feel compelled to leave a clean house and yard. I know, no surprise there. It’s more work up front, but always worth it on the return side. So I was running around the house, cleaning and weeding and watering and organizing, and not packing a single thing. Was this vacation worth it? Should I be leaving at all? What was I thinking back in March? Oh yeah, I had planned on being well.

The journey itself is enjoyable to me. Something about solo travel makes me feel competent and free. The whole flavor of travel has changed for the better since becoming single. My ex was an impatient, tense traveler. I’m chill to the point of sending my itinerary to my friends because I can never quite remember the particular details of dates and times (see first paragraph—it happens a LOT). Still, I get myself from point A to point B with little fuss and trouble.

Some people, myself included, struggle with the idea that sickness deserves a vacation. The answer is emphatically yes. Serious illness gives few breaks, and a respite punctuated with illness is better than no respite at all. Or, as my friend Paul has said, “I can be sick in Paradise or sick at home. I choose Paradise”. I knew that many people would think going on vacation would mean I was better. I am better, but I am not well. I knew I would have some bad days, perhaps during, but definitely afterward due to the stress of travel and fun. What I didn’t know was how worth it going on vacation was.

Something else went on vacation, too. My medication schedule. I can do that with Lyme. Each bug, borrelia, babesia, and bartonella, has intense defense mechanisms (biofilms,  cysts, and hiding in tissues where there is no blood flow, like eyeballs and joints and the brain), so the protocol is always changing. Most doctors pulse medications in monthly bursts, to constantly hit them with something different. That means I can, theoretically, miss a week or so of most medicines and not mess up my treatment.

Almost all Lyme literate doctors use both pharmaceuticals and herbs to treat Lyme. The pills are easy. I can take up to seven pills in one gulp, if they’re not huge. The herbs are different. I mix all the herbs in a glass, 15 drops at a time. Then I put in maybe an ounce of water and drink it. Katie watched this once and said, “That smells like some foul shit.” A note about some of the stuff I take: it is some foul shit. I don’t think about how it tastes. I just chug it. I’m still trying to figure out what in my life made me such a champion medicine taker and I’ve got nothing.

I always feel a little bit naughty that first day I don’t take my meds. The freedom from that tedium is immense, I can’t believe how easy it is to NOT take medicine. I have them with me, too tethered to the thought of needing them to leave them at home. Sometime in the afternoon of day two, as on most vacations, something loosens inside of me. I don’t care what’s going on in the world. I quit checking my phone and my computer lies idle. The medicine migrated to the bottom of my suitcase.

Isn’t that the whole purpose of vacation? A rejuvenation of mind, body and spirit? Too often we pursue vacations with a grim purpose to pack as much activity and fun into them as possible, leaving exhaustion and frustration in the wake. I much prefer my friends’ pace: puzzles, hammocks, a vague daily plan which may or may not involve an actual activity, games at night, and the freedom to do whatever you’d like.

I got myself home with little fuss, and a small bonus: dinner with another friend. I milked a few more hours of vacation, and returned home to Katie and the dogs. That might be the best part of vacations for me—the moment I walk in the door of my own home. The smell is deeply familiar and comforting, as my home smells like both my childhood and adulthood. The dogs greet me as if I’ve been gone forever. Katie bounds up the stairs and gives me a hug. “I missed you!” I’ll start retaking my medicine tomorrow. Tonight I will unpack before I let out that final exhale of vacation, before thoughts of tomorrow, with schedules and chores, creep in.

 

Share

doublechecking

I like to google the side effects of the drugs I take. I used to do this several times a day, mainly because I could never remember what they were from hour to hour. I do it a lot less now. A month ago, some not so good symptoms crept back (a whole other google rabbit hole). I went back to the doctor and I started taking liposomal artemisinin, a Chinese wormwood derivative that is effective against malaria, babesia, and Lyme (babesia is often a Lyme co-infection) The liposomal part is a fatty matrix that stabilizes the artemisinin part and helps the body absorb the artemisinin. I’m also taking a few more herbs. Cumanda, an anti-bacterial herb from the Campsiandra Angustifolia tree in the Amazon is one. Cumanda is for neuroborreliosis,  or “Lyme brain”. I’m also taking teasel root extract. That one is from Dypsacus Sylvestris, a biennial teasel plant. Teasel root extract is a cyst buster and biofilm remover. See why I had to google this shit several times a day?

I wondered which one of these herbs was causing my brain fog, liver pain, fatigue, itching, stomach problems and achy bones. As usual, there is no definitive answers. Could be the liposomal artemisinin. Some of the symptoms might be from teasel root. Others might be from cumanda. Why do I care? It doesn’t really matter, does it? Either way, I have to take them, or the alternatives, Flagyl or Mepron, or any of the pharmaceutical drugs I have also used. They have some of the same side effects, and some others that are worse.

One of the things I’ve noticed now that I am noticeably better is the herxes don’t get easier. They are not as bad as they were earlier, but again, does it matter? Sick is sick. These are mostly walking around doing things and crashing later in the day herxes, so shouldn’t I be thankful for that? I should be, but I’m not.

Oh, I forgot the last one I’m taking now, MC-Bar-2. That one is for bartonella and is a medley of herbs like Skullcap, Jamaican sarsaparilla, cordyceps, Pau d’Arco, White Willow and more. I started to read about each ingredient, but stopped after cordyceps, a fungi that the Chinese grow on caterpillars (and I’m drinking that shit? GROSS!). Also taking low-dose naloxone, the drug they use to reverse heroin overdoses. They caution me against taking any narcotic every time I refill that one, but I happily down the little white pill in hopes that it does, in fact, boost brain activity in inflamed brains like mine.

Sometimes I wonder why I keep taking all this stuff. Then Lyme comes creeping back. Once bugs get in your system, it’s hard to eradicate all of them. Once Lyme goes untreated for any length of time, no one knows if you are ever “cured”. Each bug has unique properties that make them hard to eradicate. Cysts, biofilms, protein-changing strategies, even immune modulators in tick saliva,  It’s as though the ticks and the pathogens they carry form an evil synergy  designed to fool the human immune system.

I am not making this stuff up. I wish I were sometimes. The Lyme community debates the validity of herbs vs pharmaceuticals, IV antibiotics, diet, and alternative therapies, like rifing (a highly controversial technique using electromagnetic waves, the patient holds a metal cylinder in each hand, rather like a jumpstart cable for car batteries). The herxes  I experience tell me that the herbs work, sometimes more effectively than the pharmaceuticals. Sometimes  I wonder if I’ll be on some form of maintenance herbs forever. That wouldn’t be too bad, except that the herbs taste foul. They have to be taken on an empty stomach, with a small amount of water. I look at the mixture as a tastebud wake-up call.

Why do I keep looking up both the disease and the cure? I think I have to double check to see if a) I have Lyme, and b) I am still sick with Lyme. There is a third option. I have the ridiculous theory that since I have Lyme, I will get no other diseases. The sheer lunacy of this insures that I double and triple check my symptoms, making sure that I only have Lyme. You can die from Lyme, but it is rare, if it is treated. I had to google Lyme fatality rates just now. They are low, but phrases like “drastically shortened lifespans” and “death from secondary infections” pop up too often for my taste.

There can be no other reasons than these. It’s fucked up that I still need affirmation that I do have Lyme. I don’t want it. Is that why I do it? Maybe this time I’ll see that all these symptoms are not Lyme! It’s something else, something easily cured with a few pills. And don’t you think I’d be okay with being sick by now? Apparently not. <sigh> Google will have to continue to be my support group, because I don’t particularly like support groups. It’s not that I don’t want to share information. It’s the few people who seem to use the forum as an opportunity to whine on and on about how sick they are.

Ooh, that was kind of mean. I’m sure they can’t help it, and really need the support. I like a different kind of support. I like it best when people treat me normally, teasing and harassing me as if everything is fine. It is, mostly. Except when it’s not. Then I google away, double and triple checking. Just in case.

Share

acceptance?

I fucking hate babesia. Babesia is one of my co-infections, a malaria-like parasite also called a “piroplasm”, whatever the fuck that is. It clouds my mind and saps my energy. I get angry and depressed for no reason. My eyes go wonky. All the normal boring crap, too, like fatigue and muscle aches and joint pain. For once, there is no anger at this flare-up. Am I being forced into accepting Lyme? Or am I worn down with fighting? I don’t think either is quite true. Acceptance, at least for me, smacks of giving up, worn down implies defeat. I’ll settle for the gentle euphemism of “learning to live” with Lyme.

My doctor shared his frustrations with his inability (another tricky word) to predict the outcomes of his Lyme patients. He felt I should be well by now. He wonders what factors we’re missing. So do I. We discuss my lifestyle. Am I drinking? Why, yes. I tried to drink twice in the last month. It didn’t work out too well the next few days. Alcohol is off the table once again. How about rest? My number one priority. I nap most days and get at least eight hours a night. I am like a four-year-old trying hard to give up naps but too sleepy to actually do it yet. What about stress? Yes, what about stress. Oh, you mean the stress of living? There is the stress of existing, which is essentially what I did for almost two years, and the stress of living. Existing is a sealed bubble of eating, sleeping, and being sick. Living is working, socializing, exercising, going out, traveling, and interacting with the world. YES IT IS STRESSFUL! I almost always feel behind the eight ball of my own life. Do one of the things and be sick. Do all of them and feel great. That uncertainty is stressful. So is deciding which one to prioritize on any given day.

I can accept that lifestyle choices and managing stress are all on me. My doctor accepts managing my protocol. What both of us struggle to accept is what we are missing. Was it the eleven surgeries I’ve had during my life? Perhaps all the antibiotics I took for acne in my late teens. The drugs I enthusiastically experimented with? Maybe something in the environment. It sure as hell isn’t my disposition. I’m fricking Pollyanna. We may never know for sure, and that in itself is a stressor.

Today marks the first day in weeks that my brain is working well. I had no idea how far down the slope I had gone. That’s the hallmark of Lyme brain (such a warm, fuzzy little description for losing your mind). It’s so subtle. I hope I can learn to recognize relapse symptoms more quickly. I don’t like the sensation of somnambulating through life. I may appear and act normal (well, as normal as normal is for me), but if you ask me to remember too much, or do something mentally challenging, like math, you’ll see the gaping holes in my speech, thought and memory.

I am ambivalent about this latest flare-up (relapse, setback, shitshow, whatever you want to call it). Overall, my symptoms are sputtering and losing steam. Either that or I am learning to live with my new normal. Is that acceptance, or is it defeat? I must confess I am satisfied with my current situation—lifeguarding, Airbnb, writing, exercising, and keeping the house together. I can control this amount of stress and chaos. I can adjust the intensity and frequency of all these activities when I need to, and I can push it, or I can take naps and rest. Of course this isn’t what I want. Like Veruca Salt I want it all and I want it now! I hate having limitations. Waaah! I know, cry me a river.

I guess acceptance means being content with the parameters of my illness. When I first typed this, I said “the illness”. I can scarcely admit even now, that it is MY illness, an illness that will be mine and belong to me until I die. This is just for now. I don’t want to be in this particular phase (which is basically the lifestyle of a five-year-old) forever. However, it is not merely existing anymore. It is a life, and not a bad one, either.

Share